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Basic Steps for Breeding Frogs

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The breeding techniques will be slightly different for each species of frog, but the overall method is the same. Be aware that you can not just make frogs breed, they have to be coaxed into it. Luckily, you have the control over their environment, which is the primary driving force behind breeding frogs.

First off, make sure you have a male and a female. Obviously, two frogs of the same sex will have difficulty mating. Once this primary step is out of the way, you will have to create an environment like your frogs natural habitat.

Different locations in the world will have different weather cycles. Learn as much as you can about their natural habitat. In most cases, you will have to lower the temperature in the colder months, stimulating a hibernative state. Likewise, in the warmer months, you will have to raise the temperature. This natural cycle will influence the mating cycle of the frogs.

You must make sure to include plants or branches (depending on their natural location). The frogs will hide under them or climb over the branches, as they do in the wild. You must also keep the habitat and especially the water, clean at all times. Clean and/or replace the water every couple of days to ensure a healthy atmosphere.

When your frogs do mate, the male will climb on top of the female. He will fertilize the eggs as they are laid. Watch for this as it is important for you to know when they mate and where the female lays her eggs. When they are finished, remove the frogs from the habitat, and then remove the eggs. This is important as in many cases the adult frogs will eat the eggs.

The eggs should hatch from 7 - 21 days after being laid and fertilized. Seperate the tadpoles from each other, or supply a lot of aquatic plant life in one large enclosure.

 


         
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